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I Promessi Sposi Volume 1-2 Alessandro Manzoni

I Promessi Sposi Volume 1-2

Alessandro Manzoni

Published
ISBN : 9781230438795
Paperback
238 pages
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 About the Book 

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1845 edition. Excerpt: ... the shifting of aMoreThis historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1845 edition. Excerpt: ... the shifting of a scene, Renzo and Lucia stood between them. Don Abbondio saw indistinctly--saw clearly--was terrified, astonished, enraged, buried in thought, came to a resolution- and all this, while I enzo uttered the words- Signor Curate, in the presence of these witnesses, this is my wife. Before, however, Lucias lips could form the reply, Don Abbondio dropped the receipt, seized the lamp with his left hand, and raised it in the air, caught hold of the cloth with his right, and dragged it furiously off the table, bringing to the ground in its fall, book, paper, inkstand, and sandbox- and, springing between the chair and the table, advanced towards Lucia. The poor girl, with her sweet gentle voice, trembling violently, had scarcely uttered the words, And this.... when Don Abbondio threw the cloth rudely over her head and face, to prevent her pronouncing the entire formula. Then, letting the light fall from his other hand, he employed both to wrap the cloth round her face, till she was well nigh smothered, shouting in the meanwhile, at the stretch of his voice, like a wounded bull- Perpetua ! Perpetua !-- treachery--help ! The light, just glimmering on the ground, threw a dim and flickering ray upon Lucia, who, in utter consternation, made no attempt to disengage herself, and might be compared to a statue sculptured in chalk, over which the artificer had thrown a wet cloth. When the light died away, Don Abbondio quitted the poor girl, and went groping about to find the door that opened into an inner room- and having reached it, he entered and shut himself in, unceasingly exclaiming, Perpetua! treachery, help! Out of the house! out of the house! In the other room all was confusion: Renzo, seeking to lay hold of the Curate, ...